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Monday (Book) Madness

This week I read:

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I almost didn’t make it through this one. If it hadn’t been short stories, and if I hadn’t held out hope that one of them would be a gem, this would have been one of my rate DNFs. Some of the stories had potential, but I found them overwhelmed with unnecessary details and I was underwhelmed by the endings. I found myself frequently wondering WTF. I hate being negative about a book, so I will say this one made me think.
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Does Tiffany D. Jackson write anything that isn’t a brutal, addictive onslaught to the emotions? Her books are SO good, but they make me feel so bad. Couldn’t put this down but glad it’s over.

And I finished my first audiobook:

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My first audiobook . . . which has me wondering if I’m cut out for audiobooks or not. I enjoyed the story, the narrator was great, but I feel like I missed out by not reading it. A good mystery, but if I had read it, I suspect I would have liked it even more.

I just started:

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To join me in bookish fun, click the links to friend me on Litsy or Goodreads

Monday (Book) Madness

This week I read:

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I almost didn’t read this because of a few bad reviews on Goodreads. It got off to a bumpy start, and it wasn’t entirely unpredictable, but it kept my attention and I enjoyed it. By the end it was uplifting.
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I read “Heroine” by this author and loved it so much that I decided to give another of her books a shot. This one was completely different, and not at all what I was expecting. Not bad, just not my ideal cup of tea. There’s no denying that McGinnis is a talented author, and while I didn’t love this book, I did enjoy it.

I just started:

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To join me in bookish fun, click the links to friend me on Litsy or Goodreads

Fieldwork For Fiction

Write what you know. It’s common advice for writers. But how does it apply to you and your writing?

I recently overheard a fantasy writer remark that they couldn’t “write what they know” because they “create worlds and make things up”. I get what they’re saying, but I don’t really agree with it, because all fiction writers make stuff up, right? And beyond that, all people, writers or not, know and recognize certain things.

I walk hundreds of miles a year. I’ve walked over mountains, through swamps, across beaches and scrubland and pine forests and oak woods and grassy plains . . . and plenty of habitats inbetween.

I’ve had wild boars run across the trail ten feet in front of me, seen a snake mating ball writhing in the grass, and wandered upon a ginormous alligator sunning across the path. I can describe the difference between sweat from stifling heat from that of frigid cold and that of fear. I can tell you that pines just below the timberline on a summer day in the mountains smell like Christmas. Or that the sulfuric stench of a river has briny undertones, while that of a swamp has a ‘meatier’ rotten egg odor.

While walking, I love taking photographs of interesting trees, but I can also use those different trees to help set the mood of a scene. A palm trees with spear-like projections stabbing into the air from it’s trunk, (the kind you can imagine mangled bodies impaled upon), is very different than a majestic oak with sun limned ferns growing atop a sweeping bow. I’ve seen trees with actual thorns, mangroves with spindly witch hands, and trees with gnarled limbs like knotted arthritic fingers.

 
Pay attention to all of your senses. What sounds do you hear when you go outside? Birds, insects, frogs? Traffic, sirens, jackhammers? What would you feel if those sounds suddenly stop and all you hear in the silence is your own heartbeat and the slosh of your spit as you swallow?

I guess my point is this – writing what you know isn’t just subjects you know about. It’s including sensory descriptions and emotions you can invoke, and for that, you have to get out and actively experience your life. Next time you’re at the mall, pay attention to how the smells change as you go from store to store. If you’re at a restaurant, pay attention to how the noise level varies throughout – is it louder at the bar, when you walk past the table with three kids under five, or near a group of rowdy friends?

I think most of us observe more than we realize during the course of our daily lives, and I know that, as a reader, when a writer includes something – no matter how mundane – that makes me remember an experience of my own, it draws me that much deeper into the story.

Only a small percentage of my fiction is set outdoors, but I do a lot of fieldwork to bring those scenes to life, and what I observe on the trail can apply to other fictional settings as well. (But don’t go seeking out a giant alligator so you can catalogue your body’s fear response 😬. Safety first!)

Writers – what fieldwork do you do for your fiction? And readers – what has an author done to really make you connect with a story?

(All pictures my own, most featured on my Instagram account

Monday (Book) Madness

Last week I read:

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Great ‘YA book with a purpose’. The MC always knew she’d need a liver transplant… someday. She just didn’t expect someday to arrive her senior year of high school. Mad props to the author – totally didn’t see the ending coming! (On a side note, I met this author once years ago before she was published and she wrote MG fiction, and she was so incredibly nice and friendly! So happy for her success!)
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I’d heard a lot about this book (both good and bad) so I had no idea what to expect when I started it. It’s not my preferred genre, but I’ve been slowly trying to expand my comfort zone – a little dystopian here, a little sci-fi there – and while it wasn’t my favorite book I’ve read so far this year, there’s no denying that I did enjoy it. Some beautiful prose, some vivid (nightmarish) descriptions and an engaging story made this one a win for me.

I just started:

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To join me in bookish fun, click the links to friend me on Litsy or Goodreads

A Festival For Our Furry Friends

 

See the source image

There’s a lot of sad, depressing, and enraging news out there, but every once in a while, I stumble upon an article that makes me happy. Quite often said article is satirical or entirely BS. This one, I am thrilled to report, is not. So if you need a lift today, if edits or life or the weathers has you down, I present to you this: 

Source: In Nepal, There Is A Festival Every Year To Thanks Dogs For Being Our Friends

Monday (Book) Madness

Last week, I read:

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The trilogy is over 😭 A satisfying conclusion to a great series! Suspenseful, craftily plotted and insanely well thought out. On the plus side, the blister on my fingertip (from turning pages so fast) will get to heal. But . . . I’m going to miss my fictional book friends.

 

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I”m a sucker for an homage to Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None! It wasn’t the best written book, but I enjoyed the plot and the author either hit her groove or I got used to the slightly bumpy prose by the time I was halfway in. Better than the Goodreads rating would suggest.

I just started:

The Arrival of Someday

To join me in bookish fun, click the links to friend me on Litsy or Goodreads

Shannon Hollinger, Author

Transmutation (Because It Sounds Cooler Than Metamorphosis)

2020 is the end of an era. Literally. When I started this blog (almost 10 years ago), I knew that I wanted to write. I just wasn’t sure what.

Looking back through my archives, I see book reviews, hiking adventures, recipes, quotes, memes, writing advice . . . I was all over the place. But the important thing, the only thing, really, is that it got me putting words on the screen.

Behind the blog scenes, there were magazine articles, nonfiction stories, and a ton of short fiction created. And that is where I found my writing home – in the land of make believe.

Fast forward to the present. I’ve written dozens of short stories and have a stack of finished novel manuscripts. I’ve had an editor tell me no one would ever publish the story I submitted to him only to have it accepted the same month by Suspense Magazine. I’ve had agents ignore my queries, request my manuscripts, reject my manuscripts, refer me to a colleague who they felt the manuscript would be perfect for only to never hear from said colleague . . . and still, I write.

I’ve felt my skin thicken from tissue paper to paperboard. I’ve cried my way through the bad writing days, laughed my way through the good, and stopped myself from punching a wall countless times during edits.

It’s been a long, sometimes painful, often frustrating journey. A building an author platform as an adult mystery author, realizing that all of my novels had teenage characters and it was those characters who I most enjoyed writing, expanding my reading list and develoving an ABSOLUTE love affair with YA novels, realizing that at my core I am a YA author and whoops, now I have to start all over again kind of insanity.

So . . . here I am. This is my year, so stay tuned. I hope to have some big news for you coming soon.

Shannon Hollinger, Author

 

 

 

 

How To Tell If You’re Writing In Deep Point Of View | Writers In The Storm

Here’s a great article from the Writers In The Storm blog written by guest poster Lisa Hall Wilson. Deep Point Of View can be difficult to master, but it’s a great way to learn how to show versus tell, which will strengthen your writing and draw your readers deeper into your characters and story. I hope you enjoy this article as much as I did!

https://writersinthestormblog.com/2019/11/how-to-tell-if-youre-writing-in-deep-point-of-view/

4 Techniques to Fire Up Your Fiction | Donald Mass | Writer’s Digest

The Emotional Craft of Fiction: How to Write the Story Beneath the SurfaceWhen it comes to writing tips and advice, Donald Maas is a master! It’s no secret that his book, The Emotional Craft of Fiction, changed the way I viewed writing as a whole. I stumbled on this article he wrote for Writer’s Digest back in 2009 – an oldie but a goodie – and had to share!

Source: 4 Techniques to Fire Up Your Fiction | Writer’s Digest

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